The Four Stages of Submission

 

No. Not that kind of submission. I’m talking about hitting the send button after I’ve polished my manuscript to hell and back and send it off to my editor. That kind of submission. With all due apologies to my friends who have to deal with me between the time I send a manuscript out and hear back from my editor, this is what I experience every time I send a book off for evaluation.

  1. Elation. The highest high, I’ve finally sent it off. Woo hoo I am done. Now I can start on that awesome idea I had for a book in the middle of this book.
  2. Anxiety. Oh hell, what was I thinking? It wasn’t ready. I should have spent more time editing it. Damn it’s too late. They’ll hate it. I better get to work on the next book.
  3. Anger. The hell with it. What do I care if they don’t accept it? I have other stories. So many  other stories to write. Let me channel my anger into this scene.
  4. Relief. The editor has responded. No more wondering. No more obsessively checking my email fifteen times a day.
    Substages: *1. They accepted it. Woohoo. Time to celebrate and then get to work on the next book. 2. They rejected it. Damn. Time to wallow in sadness for a bit, soothe myself with old movies, and bourbon. Then I let it go and get to work on the next book.

The key to surviving as a writer is to always get back to work. Feel the feels and then sit down and write. 

What are your stages of submission?

 

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2 thoughts on “The Four Stages of Submission

  1. You had me going there. Ha! Nice one. That’s a beautiful bird.

    I’ve submitted four things in my entire life, two of them letters to magazine editors. ~grin~ I’m happy to say only one was rejected. Meanwhile, however, I’m selfishly withholding my love child of a series, fearful of both rejection and acceptance. ~shakes head~ Best wishes!

    • Thank you! It is a double-edge sword sometimes, but I’m going to encourage you to submit you work, and I totally understand the fear of both acceptance and rejection.

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